Arraignment, R. 3:9-1

Arraignment, R. 3:9-1, right to counsel, sixth amendment, article 1 paragraph 10, U.S. Constitution, New Jersey Constitution, grand jury, indictment, New Jersey, Atlantic County, Bergen County, Burlington County, Camden County, Cape May County, Cumberland County, Essex County, Gloucester County, Hudson County, Hunterdon County, Mercer County, Middlesex County, Monmouth County, Morris County, Ocean County, Passaic County, Salem County, Somerset County, Sussex County, Union County, Warren County, criminal defense, drunk driving, traffic ticket, juvenile, attorney, lawyerWe all have bad days. But it seems to me we invariably react in one of three ways to the bad days of others: empathy, apathy, or judgment. And judgment seems to be the most popular. For example, an Atco man will soon make his first formal appearance in the Gloucester County Superior Court for his arraignment involving two separate cases. One case involves an alleged assault by auto and . I would submit the day of the collision was a bad day for him. But what is your reaction to this? How does it make you feel? Read more


Withdrawal of Plea, R. 3:9-3

Withdrawal of Plea, R. 3:9-3e, New Jersey, Rules of Court, Atlantic County, Bergen County, Burlington County, Camden County, Cape May County, Cumberland County, Essex County, Gloucester County, Hudson County, Hunterdon County, Mercer County, Middlesex County, Monmouth County, Morris County, Ocean County, Passaic County, Salem County, Somerset County, Sussex County, Union County, Warren County, criminal defense, drunk driving, traffic ticket, juvenile, attorney, lawyerNew Jersey Superior Court Judge Salem Ahto recently rejected a former Mount Olive cop’s motion for withdrawal of plea. And he took 90 minutes to do it, too! Apparently, the judge intended the lecture as a tribute. Indeed, Judge Ahto told the officer, “I don’t want you to think I just blew through this,” per nj dot com. Additionally, he said, “I’m aware of your contributions to the community.” Now that is a fine how-do-ya-do. Then again, when is the next time the judge will address an audience of 60 supporters for a defendant in his courtroom? The officer had previously entered a guilty plea to obstructing administration of law. Therefore, under the plea agreement, the State dismissed one count of Official Misconduct, and the cop received a $625 fine, with no jail time or probation. But he had to give up his job. Keep on reading!


Plea Cut Off, Rule 3:9-3

plea cut off, R. 3:9-3, rules governing the courts of the state of new jersey, rules of court, pretrial procedureA news item reminds me of a case where my client entered a negotiated plea after plea cut off.1

Millville cops investigating the alleged theft of wooden pallets from a local business have solicited the public’s assistance. The department shared security camera footage and photos on its Read more